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CANNABIS 🦉

@cannabis

⠀ ͏𝐘𝐨𝐮’𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐲 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞, 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰! ⠀ FB.com/Cannabis ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀𝐓𝐮𝐫𝐧 𝐨𝐧 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬👆

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play_circle_filled Tag someone who would love this piece! 😎@Matthias710 don’t give a f$%k😜.

Tag someone who would love this piece! 😎@Matthias 710 don’t give a f$%k😜 ...

play_circle_filled Go big or go home like my boys over @_organic_roots! Always killin the game. Check out this papaya/strawGuava stacking up proper 🔥🔥🔥.

Go big or go home like my boys over @_organic_roots ! Always killin the game. Check out this papaya/strawGuava stacking up proper 🔥🔥🔥 ...

A mystery on the Vermont Statehouse lawn -- who planted dozens of cannabis plants among the flower beds?

Capitol police say they could either be hemp or marijuana and they can't tell which. They got a report Monday that the immature plants were in the flower beds and managed to find and remove 32. They found a couple more later in the week to make the total 34.

Capitol Police Chief Matthew Romei says he's fairly certain it was not part of the state's horticultural landscaping plan.

A mystery on the Vermont Statehouse lawn -- who planted dozens of cannabis plants among the flower beds? Capitol police say they could either be hemp or marijuana and they can't tell which. They got a report Monday that the immature plants were in the flower beds and managed to find and remove 32. They found a couple more later in the week to make the total 34. Capitol Police Chief Matthew Romei says he's fairly certain it was not part of the state's horticultural landscaping plan. "The beds are maintained -- as you can see -- very well by Buildings and General Services. They really know how to run a flower bed. It's an impressive display every year but I don't think they included this in their annual rollout," he said. "We were kind of surprised. I don't think anyone was expecting to find that. Of course we still don't know whether its marijuana or hemp and, quite frankly, don't intend on spending the resources to test it cause there's not a criminal case to be had over it." Romei says they've made similar discoveries in the garden beds in previous years. Source: wcax.com ...

Tag that one person! Can I tag myself? 😜.

Tag that one person! Can I tag myself? 😜 ...

Happy 710 day fam! These diamonds from @chewberto420 are amazing! 💎💎💎.

Happy 710 day fam! These diamonds from @chewberto 420 are amazing! 💎💎💎 ...

So what do you call it?

Kush. Bud. Herb.

Who knows what to call marijuana these days?
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Born of the need for secrecy, slang has long dominated pot culture. But as entrepreneurs seek to capitalize on new laws legalizing recreational and medical marijuana, they too are grappling with what to call it.
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Heading to the dispensary to buy a few nugs or dabs? Marketers seeking to exploit the $10 billion market would prefer that you just called it cannabis.
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Shirley Halperin, an author of 2007’s “Pot Culture: The A-Z Guide to Stoner Language and Life,” has seen the shift in recent years. Not long ago, she met with an executive to talk about his company’s products. “He physically winced when I said the word ‘pot,’” she recalled. “Businesses don’t want to call it ‘weed.’” Cannabis, she said, “sounds like it has purpose in the world.” Like anything, the history of pot, weed or whatever you want to call it is complicated.
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During the Jazz Age, when singers wrote odes to the plant, it was called dope, reefer and tea. It was a drug of choice for the hippie counterculture 30 years later, often referred to as grass. Willie Nelson sang a song about pot. “I still call it weed,” said Tommy Chong, half of the Cheech & Chong comedy duo that defined stoner culture in the 1970s and ’80s. “Yeah, I think it’s the easiest. You can tell what age people are by the words they use.”
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At Cannes Lions in June, a conference in France for marketers, a panel of experts debated the language and perception of cannabis in today’s culture. “There is a generational divide when it comes to language,” Ms. Halperin said. “What was O.K., say, 10 years ago is out now.”
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Words that sounded cool in the ’60s and ’70s (remember wacky tobacky?) are woefully old-fashioned now. That’s especially true given that recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states and the District of Columbia. Medical marijuana has even broader appeal. Source: NYtimes.com.

So what do you call it? Kush. Bud. Herb. Who knows what to call marijuana these days? - Born of the need for secrecy, slang has long dominated pot culture. But as entrepreneurs seek to capitalize on new laws legalizing recreational and medical marijuana, they too are grappling with what to call it. - Heading to the dispensary to buy a few nugs or dabs? Marketers seeking to exploit the $10 billion market would prefer that you just called it cannabis. - Shirley Halperin, an author of 2007’s “Pot Culture: The A-Z Guide to Stoner Language and Life,” has seen the shift in recent years. Not long ago, she met with an executive to talk about his company’s products. “He physically winced when I said the word ‘pot,’” she recalled. “Businesses don’t want to call it ‘weed.’” Cannabis, she said, “sounds like it has purpose in the world.” Like anything, the history of pot, weed or whatever you want to call it is complicated. - During the Jazz Age, when singers wrote odes to the plant, it was called dope, reefer and tea. It was a drug of choice for the hippie counterculture 30 years later, often referred to as grass. Willie Nelson sang a song about pot. “I still call it weed,” said Tommy Chong, half of the Cheech & Chong comedy duo that defined stoner culture in the 1970s and ’80s. “Yeah, I think it’s the easiest. You can tell what age people are by the words they use.” - At Cannes Lions in June, a conference in France for marketers, a panel of experts debated the language and perception of cannabis in today’s culture. “There is a generational divide when it comes to language,” Ms. Halperin said. “What was O.K., say, 10 years ago is out now.” - Words that sounded cool in the ’60s and ’70s (remember wacky tobacky?) are woefully old-fashioned now. That’s especially true given that recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states and the District of Columbia. Medical marijuana has even broader appeal. Source: NYtimes.com ...

sounds like a plan right? So who’s coming with me!.

sounds like a plan right? So who’s coming with me! ...

Which strain are you starting with first?🤔
Sherblato, Gelly, Mint Choc Chip, Dump Truck, Purple Punch or Wedding Cake?
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📸 @scottsdalecannabisclub
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I’m going with that Gelly to start😍.

Which strain are you starting with first?🤔 Sherblato, Gelly, Mint Choc Chip, Dump Truck, Purple Punch or Wedding Cake? - 📸 @scottsdalecannabisclub - I’m going with that Gelly to start😍 ...

A Baltimore postman pleaded guilty on Monday to conspiracy to distribute marijuana on his mail route, court documents say.

According to his plea agreement, postal worker, William McRae, was paid in cash and marijuana to distribute over 100 kilograms of drugs along his mail route over the course of a year.

Court documents lay out how the scheme unfolded: Co-defendant Michael Gray would contact McRae several times a month, telling him he planned to mail marijuana into Maryland from California. McRae told Gray where to deliver the packages at different Baltimore addresses on his route, the plea agreement says.

The Investigation

Investigators spent nearly a year building a case against McRae and his co-conspirators. Initially, investigators seized three suspicious packages from McRae's route in November 2017.

A Baltimore postman pleaded guilty on Monday to conspiracy to distribute marijuana on his mail route, court documents say. According to his plea agreement, postal worker, William McRae, was paid in cash and marijuana to distribute over 100 kilograms of drugs along his mail route over the course of a year. Court documents lay out how the scheme unfolded: Co-defendant Michael Gray would contact McRae several times a month, telling him he planned to mail marijuana into Maryland from California. McRae told Gray where to deliver the packages at different Baltimore addresses on his route, the plea agreement says. The Investigation Investigators spent nearly a year building a case against McRae and his co-conspirators. Initially, investigators seized three suspicious packages from McRae's route in November 2017. "Each parcel contained approximately 1 kilogram of a green, leafy, plantlike substance that field tested positive as marijuana," an affidavit from the case reads. Then investigators spotted McRae passing a package to Gray on his route in January 2018, an affidavit says. Ten months later, surveillance was set up on McRae's route. Officers saw McRae pass two kilograms of pot to Gray, and that's when the pair was arrested. Investigators found "over 200 suspicious parcels were mailed from California to a particular ZIP code -- 21223 -- in Baltimore," court records say. "The packages routinely contained between 1 and 7 kilograms each and would often arrive in batches of up (to) 6 or 7 packages at a time," according to McRae's plea agreement. McRae is set to be sentenced July 15. Gray will be sentenced Sept. 16. Source kmbc.com ...

For real though! Who can relate?😎.

For real though! Who can relate?😎 ...

This presidential Kush from @blackleaf_ is 🔥🔥🔥
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Presidential Kush is an indica-leaning hybrid with a dynamic flavor profile. Not to be confused with Presidential OG. Presidential Kush is a cross between OG Kush and Lemon Skunk and offers a multifaceted high, beginning with mellow relaxation and later amping up into energetic mental focus. Cannabis testing lab Analytical 360 has found flowers of this strain to have between a modest 12% and a whopping 30% THC. Note that in certain locales and retail outlets, Presidential Kush may also be known as Lemon OG Kush.

Presidential Kush is distinguished by medium to large-sized flowers. These buds appear rounded and almost spherical in shape, as is typical of many varieties in the Kush family. Fluffy leaves hang together in a loose and piecey bud structure and they can easily be torn away from their central stems. The leaves themselves are a mossy shade of green and are threaded through with curly orange hairs (which are actually pistils, structures intended to capture pollen from fertilizing male plants). Finally, Presidential Kush’s flowers boast a high volume of amber trichomes, giving the leaves a slightly yellow tint..

This presidential Kush from @blackleaf_ is 🔥🔥🔥 - Presidential Kush is an indica-leaning hybrid with a dynamic flavor profile. Not to be confused with Presidential OG. Presidential Kush is a cross between OG Kush and Lemon Skunk and offers a multifaceted high, beginning with mellow relaxation and later amping up into energetic mental focus. Cannabis testing lab Analytical 360 has found flowers of this strain to have between a modest 12% and a whopping 30% THC. Note that in certain locales and retail outlets, Presidential Kush may also be known as Lemon OG Kush. Presidential Kush is distinguished by medium to large-sized flowers. These buds appear rounded and almost spherical in shape, as is typical of many varieties in the Kush family. Fluffy leaves hang together in a loose and piecey bud structure and they can easily be torn away from their central stems. The leaves themselves are a mossy shade of green and are threaded through with curly orange hairs (which are actually pistils, structures intended to capture pollen from fertilizing male plants). Finally, Presidential Kush’s flowers boast a high volume of amber trichomes, giving the leaves a slightly yellow tint. ...

A bill to legalize recreational marijuana in New York is dead for now, its sponsor said, ending a push by lawmakers and advocates to pass the measure before the end of the scheduled legislative session Wednesday.

A bill to legalize recreational marijuana in New York is dead for now, its sponsor said, ending a push by lawmakers and advocates to pass the measure before the end of the scheduled legislative session Wednesday. "Through months of negotiation and conversation with the Governor's office and my legislative colleagues, we made great strides to improve our bill and bring more people on board," state Sen. Liz Krueger, a Democrat who sponsored the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act, said in a statement. "We came very close to crossing the finish line, but we ran out of time." Despite support for the broad goal of legalization from leaders of the Democratic state legislature and Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, lawmakers were ultimately unable to agree on the details of the bill and similarly clashed with Cuomo, who has proposed his own regulatory framework. Three-way talks between Cuomo's office and lawmakers in the state Senate and Assembly took place over the weekend but had reportedly stalled by Sunday night. Cuomo and lawmakers disagreed in particular on how tax revenue from cannabis sales should be distributed. Lawmakers also fought over whether to allow an opt-in provision that would require localities to affirmatively opt in to allowing retail sales. Senate officials told The Buffalo News that they would not have enough support in the chamber if the provision were not included. Cuomo favored an opt-out provision that would allow cannabis sales statewide unless a locality specifically banned sales. Some counties, including those on Long Island, had already indicated they would not allow retail stores. - Source www.USnews.com ...

cannabis @cannabis - Instagram Hashtags mentions

cannabis @cannabis - Instagram users profiles mentions